Sunday, July 17, 2011

Abstract forms of Arts

Abstract/non-representational/non-objective art can be painting or sculpture that doesn't represent a person, place, or thing in the natural world which is completely based on what we see - color, shapes, brushworks, size, scale and, in some cases the process (http://arthistory.about.com/od/glossary_a/a/a_abstract_art.htm). Mondrian from 1917 to 1944, reduced paintings to four elements: line, shape, color, and space which can be seen in his painting Tableau 2 which is an excellent example of non-representational art.

In 1910, Kandinsky changed the most important rules of Western Art to - "concentrate on the expressive potential of pure form by stating - Art need not be a picture of anything" (Frank, 258). In his painting, Blue Mountain, he focused on form rather than the subject matter and hoped that "abstract art could provide spiritual nourishment for the modern Art" (Frank, 360).

I like the quote by Brancusi, "Simplicity is not an end in art, but one arrives at simplicity in spite of oneself, in approaching the real sense of things."


Abstract Speed - The Car Has Passed by Giacomo Balla is an excellent example of an abstract work of Art. When I see this painting for the first time, I noticed the green color and the distracting curves in blue that overlaps the green spherical objects. It caught my eyes and my mind wanted to know more about it as I was only looking at it form. I couldn't even guess what this piece of art all about, until, I see the title of the piece of the Art. Then, I related the artists work to speed and now, I would see the road, green mountains, blue sky and most definitely - the speed!

To appreciate the work of art, I don't think we actually need to have its title. But, saying that I would also like to take into account - the incident, that happened to me when I looked in to Giacomo Balla's Abstract Speed - The Car Has Passed by. I appreciated the art piece in its forms and content but, for the subject matter and meaning, I had to look at the title of the Art to actually, fully, appreciate the piece of Art.

When I went to Denver Art Museum, I appreciated a lot of art and many of them - I even didn't bother to look at the title. But, with the non-representational Art, after looking at the Art piece, my eyes were following quickly to the title.

Therefore, as far as by experience with the process of appreciating Art so far, I would like to have title of the abstract piece of art to fully appreciate the work. For other forms of art, it would not matter as much for myself but definitely helpful to see from the artist's eye view!

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